5 Takeaways From the Carlock Copeland 2017 Accounting Risk Program in Nashville, TN

1. Cyber Insurance is cheap and important to protect against risks not covered by E&O. Work with a knowledgeable broker and insurer and buy the coverage because the risk is real and growing.

2. Make sure your engagement letter includes:
• a specific description of the work you will do;
• limitation of damages provision where not precluded by standards;
• indemnification where not prohibited by standards;
• disclaimers where appropriate ( i.e. AUP’s);
• jurisdiction, venue and choice of law provisions; and
• a provision for the client to pay for time and expense you incur for subpoena compliance.

Watch out for client changes including cyber representations and indemnifications of any kind.

3. Evaluate the risk to your firm before responding to subpoenas or document requests.  Consultation with your insurer or outside counsel may be time well spent.  The risk runs from minimal to existential and different risks require different responses.

4. You save money by not engaging with bad clients.  Red flags include:

• financially stressed or unprofitable  clients;
• clients whose work you are not really equipped to handle;
• clients whose interests conflict with other clients; and
• clients who lack management integrity.

These all should be evaluated for disengagement. Consider firing  your bottom 5 or 10% and investing those resources into developing better opportunities.

5. All of us have clients who present some special risk.  Do what you can to mitigate that risk with:
• thorough client acceptance procedures;
• engagement letters;
• robust conflict analysis; and
• continuous reevaluation.

Employ detailed financial management including precise billing entries, timely billing and early AR follow-up in order to spot problems quickly.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Print this pageEmail this to someone

Does Your Business Policy Actually Protect You? If it has a “Professional Services” Exclusion, it might not

If you did not believe it before, you can believe it now—Ponzi-scheme cases make bad law.  On July 5, 2017, the Eleventh Circuit decided Furr v. National Union Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh (No. 15-14716), in which the court considered the impact of a “professional services” exclusion in a bank’s executive and organization liability insurance policy.*  The court held that there was no coverage for anyone because some of the claims asserted were related to the professional services that the bank rendered to the Ponzi scheme.  In denying coverage to everyone, the court reviewed this exclusion:

The Insurer shall not be liable to make any payment for Loss in connection with any Claim made against any Insured alleging, arising out of, based upon, or attributable to the Organization’s or any Insured’s performance of or failure to perform professional services for others, or any act(s), error(s) or omission(s) relating thereto.

The court upheld coverage denial (1) because the policy did not contain a severability provision and (2) because the text of the exclusion prohibited payment if a claim is made against any insured who performed or failed to perform professional services.  To be clear: if anyone was a professional subject to a claim (or performing professional services), no one gets coverage, even non-professionals.

This has two important consequences: First, if a claim is made under a policy with similar contents, then claiming a legal, accounting, or medical error will jeopardize coverage for everyone.  Second, and perhaps more importantly, this particular policy evidently does not protect a bank from claims arising from banking services because those services are professional enough to be encompassed by the exclusion.

Exclusions like the professional services exclusion (and the personal injury exclusion) are designed to keep claims inside the appropriate policy and preclude doubling-up on coverage across multiple policies.  That is fair.  A D&O policy shouldn’t cover personal injury—that is the role of the general liability policy.  But excluding coverage based on a bank’s banking services seems to have left the bank’s executives without any coverage.  That is a harsh result.

I do not mean to sound shrill, but everyone should look at their policies and make sure that they actually have the coverage that they intend to have both from the perspective of whether the company’s services would be included in the “professional services” exclusion and to make sure that an errant claim touching on a professional’s work inside the business does not jeopardize coverage for everyone.

_____

* I have not actually seen the policy, but this “executive and organizational” policy sounds more like a Director & Officers (D&O) policy than an Errors and Omissions (E&O) policy.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Print this pageEmail this to someone

Can you name Justice Kennedy’s 2017 Term-Ending 5-4 Blockbuster?

On June 26, 2017, the Supreme Court decided CalPERS v. ANZ Securities, Inc., in which it declined to create a judicial exception to the statute of repose in Section 11 cases arising under the Securities Act of 1933.  When Congress passed its cornerstone securities laws in 1933 and 1934, it created an express cause of action against misrepresentations made in connection with the initial offerings of securities.  That cause of action was limited by a two-tier time limitation system: a one-year statute of limitations running from discovery of the misrepresentation and a three-year statute of repose running from the issuance of the security.  Steamy stuff, right?

CalPERS, California’s state pension entity and frequent securities plaintiff, decided to opt-out of a timely class action to file its own separate suit outside of the three-year statute of repose.  In 1974, the Supreme Court had created a form of equitable tolling of antitrust claims relating to individual suits and class-actions.  In this case, the Supreme Court said that American Pipe involved tolling a statute of limitations, which courts can do, but that courts were not permitted to toll a statue of repose.

Three lessons here:

  1. New public companies can have confidence that they will not face new Section 11 suits following three years from their IPO.  Definitely a cupcake worthy day to calendar for companies accepting public capital.
  2. Parties should be very careful in leaving class actions.  Instead, they can consider a request to be added as a named plaintiff or other procedural decides inside a timely suit.  (And lawyers should study the difference between a statute of limitations and a statute of repose.)
  3. Not everything that happens in the Supreme Court in June involves an existential crisis.

The opinion is available in full:  https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/16pdf/16-373_pm02.pdf.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Print this pageEmail this to someone

Three Take-Aways from the PLUS Seminar on Mediating Complex Director & Officer (D&O) Claims

Three Take-Aways from the PLUS Seminar on Mediating Complex Director & Officer (D&O) Claims:

  1. Mediation is not a day-of event.  Counsel are well served to work very hard before the mediation to set expectations of parties, carriers, other counsel (including coverage counsel), and the mediator.  The panel noted that, even when a mediation is conducted in person, plaintiffs and carriers often have a range of authority that can be difficult to alter the day of mediation.  Surprises at mediation frustrate the process and do not materially advance settlement potential.  Counsel for all sides must engage constituent decision makers so that they are well informed and understand the risks so that they can bring appropriate authority to a mediation.
  2. Informational asymmetries may hinder the mediation process before, during, and after a mediation.  Participants need to understand what risk plaintiffs are presenting in a case. Defendants must offer honest assessments to carriers—it does not help to tell a carrier that there is no liability throughout a case and then ask for a large check in mediation.  Likewise, if you expect coverage to play a role in the negotiation, in most cases it makes sense to brief the mediator and plaintiff so that they can factor a coverage issue into their calculus.  Finally, no one is scared by a plaintiff or defendant who says they have a persuasive case but is reluctant to present detailed facts about the elements of a claim. 
  3. Defendants should be up-front with insurers about their settlement preferences.  Broadly speaking, litigants fall into two camps at a negotiation: (a) pay a plaintiff as much as needed to end litigation today and (b) pay defense counsel as much as needed to defeat the claim.  While the party’s attitude towards settlement won’t be dispositive of the carrier’s willingness to negotiate, it will inform the carrier’s authority and attitude about the case.  Psychology matters more than people care to admit.
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Print this pageEmail this to someone

Did the Georgia Legislature Just Delete the Corporate Duty of Loyalty?

On May 9, 2017, Governor Deal signed House Bill 192 into law.  For claims arising after July 1, 2017, O.C.G.A. §§ 14-2-830(a) (directors); 14-2-842(a) (officers) will provide:

A [director or officer] shall discharge his perform his or her duties as a [director or officer], including his duties as a member of a committee: (1) In a manner he believes in good faith to be in the best interests of the corporation; and with the degree of (2) With the care an ordinarily prudent person in a like position would exercise under similar circumstances. 

That strike through of “to be in the best interests of the corporation” is pretty stark, right?  Perhaps all of an officer’s or director’s duty of loyalty to a company will be placed in the duty of good faith.  But perhaps the legislature wanted to bar an end-run around its duty-of-care enactment by narrowing the statutory duty of loyalty to violations of O.C.G.A. § 14-2-861(interested party transactions) and O.C.G.A. § 14-2-832 (unlawful distributions), which are still prohibited.  Time will tell…

The main thrust of the legislative amendment was to enhance protections for corporate decision making by adding this text:

There shall be a presumption that the process [a director or officer] followed in arriving at decisions was done in good faith and that such [director or officer] has exercised ordinary care; provided, however, that this presumption may be rebutted by evidence that such process constitutes gross negligence by being a gross deviation of the standard of care of [a director or officer] in a like position under similar circumstances.

O.C.G.A. §§ 14-2-830(c) (directors); 14-2-842(c) (officers).

These amendments are a response to FDIC v. Loudermilk, in which the Georgia Supreme Court held that the substance or wisdom of a corporate decision was unreviewable in court absent gross misconduct.  295 Ga. 579, 581 (2014).  But the Court also held that in order to obtain deference for their decisions, corporate actors’ process for making their decisions was reviewable under a simple negligence standard: officers and directors “may be liable for a failure to exercise ordinary care with respect to the way in which business decisions are made.”  Id. at 593.

In amending the statute, the legislature addressed the obvious point that deference to ultimate corporate decisions is of little value if the there is no deference to the decision-making process.  Once this law is in effect, corporate officers and director are presumed to have acted in good faith in the process used to make business decisions.

If you want to know more, look out for a more in-depth treatment in our next firm newsletter.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Print this pageEmail this to someone