Does Your Business Policy Actually Protect You? If it has a “Professional Services” Exclusion, it might not

If you did not believe it before, you can believe it now—Ponzi-scheme cases make bad law.  On July 5, 2017, the Eleventh Circuit decided Furr v. National Union Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh (No. 15-14716), in which the court considered the impact of a “professional services” exclusion in a bank’s executive and organization liability insurance policy.*  The court held that there was no coverage for anyone because some of the claims asserted were related to the professional services that the bank rendered to the Ponzi scheme.  In denying coverage to everyone, the court reviewed this exclusion:

The Insurer shall not be liable to make any payment for Loss in connection with any Claim made against any Insured alleging, arising out of, based upon, or attributable to the Organization’s or any Insured’s performance of or failure to perform professional services for others, or any act(s), error(s) or omission(s) relating thereto.

The court upheld coverage denial (1) because the policy did not contain a severability provision and (2) because the text of the exclusion prohibited payment if a claim is made against any insured who performed or failed to perform professional services.  To be clear: if anyone was a professional subject to a claim (or performing professional services), no one gets coverage, even non-professionals.

This has two important consequences: First, if a claim is made under a policy with similar contents, then claiming a legal, accounting, or medical error will jeopardize coverage for everyone.  Second, and perhaps more importantly, this particular policy evidently does not protect a bank from claims arising from banking services because those services are professional enough to be encompassed by the exclusion.

Exclusions like the professional services exclusion (and the personal injury exclusion) are designed to keep claims inside the appropriate policy and preclude doubling-up on coverage across multiple policies.  That is fair.  A D&O policy shouldn’t cover personal injury—that is the role of the general liability policy.  But excluding coverage based on a bank’s banking services seems to have left the bank’s executives without any coverage.  That is a harsh result.

I do not mean to sound shrill, but everyone should look at their policies and make sure that they actually have the coverage that they intend to have both from the perspective of whether the company’s services would be included in the “professional services” exclusion and to make sure that an errant claim touching on a professional’s work inside the business does not jeopardize coverage for everyone.

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* I have not actually seen the policy, but this “executive and organizational” policy sounds more like a Director & Officers (D&O) policy than an Errors and Omissions (E&O) policy.

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