Georgia Supreme Court Reverses on 30b6 Testimony

The Georgia Supreme Court reversed the Court of Appeals’ decision in the case of Yugueros v. Robles and remanded for review of whether a corporate representative was qualified to give standard of care testimony in a medical malpractice case. In Yugueros, the medical issue was whether a stat CT scan was needed after discharge from an emergency department. The post-abdominal surgery patient presented to the emergency department with pain. An x-ray was read as unremarkable, but with a recommendation for a CT scan. Dr. Yugueros was contacted after the pain worsened.  Dr. Yugueros saw the patient, but did not order a CT scan.

During the litigation, plaintiff served a notice of deposition for a corporate representative (a “30b6 witness”). Dr. Yugueros’ partner was designated as the representative of the group. During the 30b6 deposition, the representative testified that Dr. Yugueros ordered a CT scan, when, in fact, she had not. The follow-up questions indicated that the representative considered ordering a CT scan part of the standard of care. Before trial, Dr. Yugueros and her group moved to exclude the 30b6 witness testimony because it was not based on facts in the record, consistent with the rules regarding expert witness testimony. Plaintiff opposed, and argued that it was an admission against interest. The trial court excluded the testimony and the Court of Appeals reversed because the testimony was not “expert” testimony but rather an admission against interest.

On certiorari, the Supreme Court reversed, holding that while depositions may be used by an adverse party “for any purpose,” that does not trump the rules regarding the admissibility of evidence, including the requirement that opinion testimony be based on facts. The Court sent the case back to the Court of Appeals for further review.

Take-home: the case is not yet decided. But, it demonstrates that deposition testimony must still meet other evidentiary thresholds before it becomes admissible into evidence.

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