Tennessee Supreme Court Holds That Full and Undiscounted Medical Bills may be Submitted as Proof of Reasonable Medical Expenses

The Tennessee Supreme Court has issued its long-awaited decision in the Dedmon v. Steelman case. This case has direct and significant consequences to personal injury litigation in Tennessee. In short, defendants may not argue that the amount actually received by a medical provider is the reasonable amount of a plaintiff’s medical bills.  Plaintiffs may submit undiscounted medical bills in full as proof of reasonable expenses.

The Tennessee Supreme Court granted an appeal in Dedmon to address whether its ruling in West v. Shelby County Healthcare Corp., 459 S.W.3d 33 (Tenn. 2014) applies in personal injury cases. In West, the court held that a hospital’s reasonable charges under Tennessee’s hospital lien statute are the amount the hospital accepts from the patient’s private insurer, not the full amount of the medical bills sent to the patient.

The Supreme Court released its decision on November 17, 2017.  The court held that the collateral source rule applies to personal injury claims in which the collateral benefit at issue is private insurance. Consequently, plaintiffs may submit evidence of the injured party’s full, undiscounted medical bills as proof of reasonable expenses. Furthermore, defendants are precluded from submitting evidence of discounted rates accepted by medical providers from an insurer in order to rebut the plaintiff’s proof that the full, undiscounted charges are reasonable.

The court reasoned that to allow defendants to submit discounted rates would conflict with the collateral source rule. However, defendants remain free to submit any other competent evidence to rebut a plaintiff’s proof on the reasonableness of medical expenses, so long as that evidence does not conflict with the collateral source rule.

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Georgia Court of Appeals Affirms Exclusion of Doctor’s Substance Abuse

In a lengthy ruling covering many issues related to a trial, the Georgia Court of Appeals affirmed the exclusion of a doctor’s past substance abuse issues on the grounds of relevance. In the case of Doherty v. Brown, et al., issued on November 18, 2016, the Court addressed numerous issues arising out of a $22 million verdict against a pain physician and his practice group. The Plaintiff claimed that the doctor’s past substance abuse issues went to the question of “patient safety.” The doctor moved in limine and the trial court granted the motion. When Plaintiff attempted to bring it up at trial, the doctor objected and the trial court sustained the objection. On appeal, Plaintiff claimed the evidence should have been admitted. The Court disagreed, holding that the trial court properly exercised its discretion to exclude the evidence because there was no proof the doctor was impaired at the time of the surgery at issue.

The take-home is that the appellate courts have repeatedly held that evidence of a physician’s past substance use or abuse is not relevant to the issue of malpractice unless there is proof of impairment at the time of the incident.

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Welcome to our Health Law & Regulation Update Blog!

Welcome to our blog! Through this blog, the members of the Health Care practice group at Carlock Copeland & Stair will share legislative, case law, regulatory, and administrative law updates and trends. We plan to cover topics such as medical malpractice, tort reform, HIPAA and medical privacy compliance, EMTALA compliance, and overpayment reviews, audits, and fraud matters. We hope you will check with us often to get the latest updates.

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Carlock Copeland Health Law and Regulation Update

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Carlock, Copeland & Stair, a civil litigation firm, has a reputation for forceful, creative and cost-effective advocacy on behalf of its clients. Formed in 1970 with five attorneys operating out of a downtown Atlanta office, we now have over 80 civil litigation attorneys handling legal matters across the Southeast from offices in Atlanta, GA, Charleston, SC and Chattanooga, TN.

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