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Georgia Court of Appeals Reverses for Exclusion of Affidavit – Recent Blog Posting By Eric Frisch

October 20, 2016

Recent blog posting by Eric Frisch.

The Georgia Court of Appeals reversed a defense verdict on the grounds the trial court improperly “prohibited” a plaintiff from refreshing the recollection of a witness with an affidavit that was not disclosed in discovery.

Plaintiff alleged she suffered weakness in her legs, lost the ability to stand, and urinary incontinence following the second in a series of lower back injections performed by the defendant anesthesiologist. The second injection was performed on May 12. The anesthesiologist testified she assessed Plaintiff after the injection and there were no problems walking. The staff testified Plaintiff would not have been discharged if there were problems. On May 14, the anesthesiologist received a phone message from Plaintiff saying that her legs were “hardly working at all.” The anesthesiologist called Plaintiff, who said he was having spasms and pain, but did not mention other problems. The anesthesiologist testified she offered to see Plaintiff, among other things. Plaintiff disputed the anesthesiologist’s version of the events. Plaintiff testified that the anesthesiologist did not offer to see her and that she could not recall whether she told her about the urinary issues. On May 18, Plaintiff went to an orthopedist, who operated on her.

The key issue was the testimony of a fact witness doctor who employed the anesthesiologist, Dr. Gadlage. Plaintiff disclosed Dr. Gadlage’s name in interrogatory responses, but did not identify an affidavit she had obtained from Dr. Gadlage about a key phone conversation around May 14. It appears Plaintiff obtained the affidavit after responding to discovery initially, but did not supplement the discovery responses. Dr. Gadlage was listed in the pretrial order as a witness, but Plaintiff’s counsel told defense counsel that Dr. Gadlage was only a “character witness,” and would not be called on standard of care. Defendant did not depose Dr. Gadlage.

Dr. Gadlage testified at trial that he remembered talking with Plaintiff about pain, possibly weakness. He could not remember Plaintiff talking about the inability to walk or urinary incontinence. Plaintiff then sought to use the affidavit, presenting it for the first time. The defense objected. Plaintiff conceded at a sidebar that she had not disclosed the affidavit, believing it to be work product. The trial court prevented Plaintiff from using the affidavit, even to refresh Dr. Gadlage’s recollection. The defense won.

The Court of Appeals reversed, holding that prohibition of the use of the affidavit was legal error. Rather, the trial court should have continued the case, declared a mistrial, or allowed the defense to review the affidavit and take a deposition, if needed. The Court recognized that Plaintiff “acted purposefully” in failing to disclose the affidavit, but concluded that Dr. Gadlage was a known witness and that exclusion or prohibition was not the appropriate remedy.

The case is Anglin, et al. v. Smith, A16A1405 (October 12, 2016).

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